June Meeting – Thursday 18th

I am very pleased and grateful to say that our June meeting content is coming from Paul Randall of SQL Skills, hopefully you all recognise the name but Paul’s bio is below as an update. Paul will be presenting his 90 minute session (Performance Troubleshooting using Wait Statistics) remotely, starting at 18:00 on Thursday 18th June. We will be meeting from 17:30 to let us have time to get a drink and settle in the meeting room.

Performance Troubleshooting Using Wait Statistics
One of the first things you should check when investigating performance issues are wait statistics – as these can often point you in the direction for further analysis. Unfortunately many people misinterpret what SQL Server is telling them and jump to conclusions about how to solve the problem – what is often called ‘knee-jerk performance tuning’. In this session, you will learn what waits are, how to analyze them, and potential solutions to common problem patterns.

Paul Randall
SQL Skills CEO / Owner
Paul is a Microsoft SQL Server MVP and a Microsoft Regional Director. He spent 9 years working on the SQLServer team, writing DBCC CHECKDB, and ultimately responsible for the entire Storage Engine. In 2007 Paul left Microsoft to co-own and run SQLskills.com, and is a world-renowned author, consultant, and top-rated speaker on SQL Server performance tuning, administration, internals, and HA/DR. When he’s not tweeting, blogging, or helping someone recover from a disaster, he’s likely to be underwater somewhere in the world with his wife, Kimberly L. Tripp.

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About d_a_green

My background includes working as a Data Architect, Database Developer, systems integrator, ETL specialist and DBA, as well as tutoring and actively promoting professional development and mentoring. I am an active member of SQL South West User Group, and occasionally present or blog about topics which interest me. I'm a Friend of RedGate. When not facing a computer screen I can be found walking, usually on the moors.